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Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Written by Herself

Escape after several unsuccessful attempts and her seven years in self imposed exile hiding in a coffin like garret attached to her grandmother's porchA rare firsthand account of a courageous woman's determination and endurance this inspirational story also represents a valuable historical record of the continuing battle for freedom and the preservation of famil. Filled with sadness heartache and misery Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is the personal story of Harriet Ann Jacobs known as Linda Linda was born into slavery and enjoyed

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The true story of an individual's struggle for self identity self preservation and freedom Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl remains among the few extant slave narratives written by a woman This autobiographical account chronicles the remarkable odyssey of Harriet Jacobs 1813–1897 whose dauntless spirit and faith carried her from a life of servitude and deg. This book was first published in 1861 and reprinted in the 1970s Scholars initially doubted it was written by a slave Thankfully Harvard University Press authenticated and publis

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Radation in North Carolina to liberty and reunion with her children in the NorthWritten and published in 1861 after Jacobs' harrowing escape from a vile and predatory master the memoir delivers a powerful and unflinching portrayal of the abuses and hypocrisy of the master slave relationship Jacobs writes frankly of the horrors she suffered as a slave her eventual. A human being sold in the free city of New York The bill of sale is on record and future generations will learn from it that women were articles of traffic in New York late in t


About the Author: Harriet Ann Jacobs

Linda Brent Harriet was born in Edenton North Carolina to Daniel Jacobs and Delilah Her father was a mulatto carpenter and slave owned by Dr Andrew Knox Her mother was a mulatto slave owned by John Horniblow a tavern owner Harriet inherited the status of both her parents as a slave by birth She was raised by Delilah until the latter died around 1819 She then was raised by her mother's mistress Margaret Horniblow who taught her how to sew read and writeIn 1823 Margaret Horniblow died and Harriet was willed to Horniblow's niece Mary Matilda Norcom whose father Dr James Norcom became her new master She and her brother John went to live with the Norcoms in Edenton Norcom subjected her to sexual harassment for nearly a decade He refused to allow her to marry any other man regardless of status and pressured her to become his concubine and to live in a small house built for her just outside the town Attempting to deflect Norcom’s advances she became involved with a consensual lover Samuel Sawyer a free white man and a lawyer who eventually became a Senator She and Sawyer were parents to two children Joseph and Louisa Matilda named Benny and Ellen in the book also owned by Norcom Harriet reported that Norcom threatened to sell her children if she refused his sexual advances She then moved to her grandmother’s house and was allowed to stay there because Norcom’s jealous wife would no longer allow her to live in the Norcom houseBy 1835 her domestic situation had become unbearable; her lack of cooperation prompted Norcom to send her to work on a plantation in Auburn Upon finding out that Norcom planned to send her children into labor as well she decided to escape She reasoned that with her gone Norcom would deem her children a nuisance and would sell them First she found shelter at neighbors’ homes before returning to her grandmother’s house For nearly seven years she lived in a small crawlspace in her grandmother's attic through periods of extreme heat and cold and she spent the time practicing her reading and writingAfter Norcom sold Harriet's brother John and her two children to a slave trader Sawyer purchased them and brought them to live with Harriet's grandmother Sawyer was elected to Congress in 1837 and took John with him during travels in the North John eventually escaped in 1838 Harriet’s daughter Louisa was summoned to take John’s place before she was sent to live with Sawyer’s cousins in New York CityAided by the Vigilant Committee Harriet escaped by boat to Philadelphia Pennsylvania She started living as a free woman and later moved to New York City in 1842 She found employment there as a nursemaid Her most notable employer was the abolitionist Nathaniel Parker Willis She reunited briefly with her daughter in Brooklyn When she learned that Norcom planned to come to New York searching for her she retreated to Boston where her brother was staying She made arrangements for her son in Edenton to be sent to Boston and she soon returned to New York Reward noticed issued for the return of Harriet JacobsIn October 1844 she revealed to Mary Willis wife of Nathaniel that she was an escaped slave To avoid further endangerment she and her daughter were granted escape to Boston again where Harriet briefly worked as a seamstress The following spring Mary Willis died and Harriet returned to Nathaniel Willis to care for his daughterBy 1849 Harriet had taken residence in Rochester New York where much abolitionist work took place She befriended Amy Post who suggested she write about her life as a slave The next year she fled to Massachusetts yet again after Norcom’s daughter Mary and Mary’s husband Daniel Mess attempted to reclaim Harriet and her children on the basis that Mary had inherited Harriet and



10 thoughts on “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl Written by Herself

  1. says:

    Harriet Jacobs book is uite a nuanced account of slavery from the point of view of one who is not physically abused This does not make slavery any better being owned and used and having no free will cannot ever be anything but terrible but it was less painful For most slave owners slaves were extremely expensive farm animals and only the richest who could afford 'herds' of them would be able to maltreat them on a continu

  2. says:

    This book was first published in 1861 and reprinted in the 1970s Scholars initially doubted it was written by a

  3. says:

    A remarkable and vivid autobiography that details the life of Harriet Jacobs as a slave in North Carolina in the mid 1800s My Master had power and law on his side I had a determined will There is might in each uote from Incidents in the Life of a Slave GirlThis should be reuired reading in YA and history students in schools as it is documents the author’s life as a slave and her fight for freedom for herself and her c

  4. says:

    A human being sold in the free city of New York The bill of sale is on record and future generations will learn from it that women were articles of traffic in New York late in the nineteenth century of the Christ

  5. says:

    Book Review Harriet Ann Jacob’s work was similar to Frederick Douglass’ narrative in that both of the pieces read so uickly and easily I very much enjoyed Jacob’s piece The language seemed so real and almost

  6. says:

    Harriet Ann Jacobs Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is a harrowing account of one woman's journey from slavery to freedom It is one of only a few remaining slave narratives written by and about womenHarriet

  7. says:

    Reader it is not to awaken sympathy for myself that I am telling you truthfully what I suffered in slavery I do

  8. says:

    Never having read a memoir written by a person living under the yoke of slavery I found this autobiography painful and enlightening Harriet Jacobs must have been a wonderfully strong woman to endure what she did and to demand her full rights as a human being She refused to give in to the sexual demands of her owner Let's examine th

  9. says:

    Filled with sadness heartache and misery Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl is the personal story of Harriet Ann Jacobs known as Linda Linda was born into slavery and enjoyed a life of childish happiness for a short time But when her mothe

  10. says:

    I found this book in the free classics section of the other night when I couldn't sleep I couldn't put it down finished the whole thing within 30 hours Slavery is such a heartbreaking thing this book really helped me understand how devastating it was and why it had such a lasting impact on our society Highly recommend

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