[Rory Stewart] The Marches [m m supernatural Book] Ebook – Epub, TXT and Kindle ePUB free

Rory Stewart À 2 Read

The Marches

Ed Kingdom And as the end approaches the elder Stewart's stubborn charm transforms this chronicle of nations into a fierce exuberant encounter between a father and a son This is a profound reflection on family landscape and history by a powerful and original writerThe miracle of The Marches is not so much the treks Stewart describes pulling in all possible relevant history as the monument that emerges to his beloved father New York Times Book Review This was a very strange book I started off loving it and then it curdled on meThe trouble with a travel book is that you have to like the narrator I liked Rory Stewart s father Brian and this is largely a book about Brian I started off liking Rory too but the time I spent with him the the very high opinion he had of himself started to grate There are some wonderful bits in this book and I m not at all sorry I ve read it but there s also a narrowness of perspective a smug pettiness that emerges slowly I love the landscape he s writing about I m not at all averse to his thesis but as time went on I felt and patronized

Summary The Marches

With every fresh encounter from an Afghanistan veteran based on Hadrian's Wall to a shepherd who still counts his flock in sixth century words Stewart uncovers about the forgotten peoples and languages of a vanished country now crushed between England and Scotland Stewart and his father are drawn into unsettling reflections on landscape their parallel careers in the bygone British Empire and Ira and the past present and uncertain future of the Unit We tend to think of the UK as one complete country but there are separate countries here that have their own distinct identity and outlook This loosely defined border between us and the Scottish has existed since Roman times Their farthest outpost it suffered from marauding Picts and Celts who took every opportunity to give the Romans a bloody nose hence why they built Hadrian s Wall It was this 200 year old monument that Stewart chose to walk as his first journey in this book Some of the time he walked with his elderly father though not the whole route choosing to walk a short way before meeting elsewhere Sometime he walk with soldiers not long returned from Afghanistan a country that he knew from a walk described in The Places in Between The second part of the book is a walk that he takes from his home in Cumbria to his father s house in Broich This 380 mile route takes him through the border country or has he calls it the Middleland Mixing sleeping out on mountains staying in other accommodation he takes 21 days to complete it but it is as much a discovery of the landscape region and the people that inhabit it and learning about its fluid and torrid past His third journey is a metaphorical one it is a celebration and tribute to his father someone who was very dear to himIt is a difficult book to classify it is a travel book in parts and a history book in others and a homage to his father at the end Parts of the book are really well written my favourite being the Middleland walk where he crosses the political cultural and geological boundaries of this borderland It didn t seem uite as focused as it could have been though It was enjoyable though and will be reading The Places in Between as I picked up a copy recently

Download ✓ PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free À Rory Stewart

An unforgettable tale National GeographicIn The Places in Between Rory Stewart walked some of the most dangerous borderlands in the world Now he travels with his eighty nine year old father a comical wily courageous and infuriating former British intelligence officer along the border they call home On Stewart's four hundred mile walk across a magnificent natural landscape he sleeps on mountain ridges and in housing projects in hostels and farmhouses I think sometimes interweaving seemingly disparate threads can work well in non fiction unfortunately in this book I think it muddied the waters Rory Stewart once did a walk across Afghanistan which you can read about in his book The Places in Between which got a lot of acclaim Much to my chagrin he continuously references this journey and book throughout The Marches At times he seems to be trying to find connections between Afghanistan and the borderlands between historical Scotland and England but failing in my opinion He also seems to have written this book not long after the death of his father and underlying everything is a clear desire to somehow pay tribute to his father So also entwined in this narrative are reflections on his father s work in Asia Too many ingredients leading to very little clarityThe only reason I actually read the entire thing is that this land is my land as much as it is his land A healthy uarter of my ancestry comes from the MacGregor lineage a clan which lived in andor bordered the land he is discussing for centuries Until the great migratory period between 1831 and 1931 where many people moved away but not his family except for working extensively overseas This is when my Scottish ancestors came to the United States as well to a very similar landscape So I found myself combing the text for information on the history of the actual land which is what I was hoping for from the book s description From a few conversations he references with his Dad I think that what Rory Stewart was assuming he would find was not as extensive as to fill a book and as padding he has put everything else in I would have preferred a shorter book with focus Thanks to the publisher for giving me an early review copy through NetGalley


About the Author: Rory Stewart

The Places in BetweenIn 2003 he became the coalition Deputy Governor of Maysan and Dhi ar two provinces in the Marsh Arab region of Southern Ira He has written for a range of publications including the New York Times Magazine the London Review of Books the Sunday Times the Guardian the Financial Times and Granta In 2004 he was awarded the Order of the British Empire and became a Fellow of the Carr Centre at Harvard University In 2006 he moved to Kabul where he established the



10 thoughts on “The Marches

  1. says:

    I've previously read both Stewart's The Places In Between and Prince of the Marshes I found both books to be illuminating and informational as well as engaging I felt that they really gave me an insight into the situations and cultures of Afghanistan and Ira respectively However I have to say that I don't feel that Stewart's change of focus in 'The Marches' works as well Unfortunately it also lessened to a degree my personal respect for

  2. says:

    I think sometimes interweaving seemingly disparate threads can work well in non fiction unfortunately in this book I think it muddied the waters Rory Stewart once did a walk across Afghanistan which you can read about in his book The

  3. says:

    Maybe this was too ambitious for me considering I don't read a lot of non fiction that isn't memoir or essays I thought this would be an interesting read about a man's life in conjunction with his findings on a long walk across the UK but it turned out to be a bit too tedious for me The information is dense and the narrat

  4. says:

    We tend to think of the UK as one complete country but there are separate countries here that have their own distinct identity and outlook This loosely defined border between us and the Scottish has existed since Roman times Their farthest outpost it suffered from marauding Picts and Celts who took every opportunity to give the Romans a bloody nose hence why they built Hadrian’s Wall It was this 200 year old monument that Stewart chose

  5. says:

    This is a fascinating and complicated book I picked it up because I'm currently fascinated by the borders I'm not close enough to go and walk the ground myself always the best way to learn a place but I was hoping that reading the account of someone who had might give me a sense of the land It did but it also of

  6. says:

    I was a Goodreads winner of this book I liked this book but didn't love it The history of Scotland and England was great I

  7. says:

    35 stars rounded up to 4I enjoyed reading The Marches Border Walks With My Father by Rory Stewart He’s been in the news here recently having stood for leadership of the Conservative Party and has now formally stood down fr

  8. says:

    FROM MY BLOG Hadrian's Wall constructed by the Romans from AD 122 to about 128 crosses northern England from Newcastle through Carlisle to Bowness on the Solway Firth In 2010 I followed the wall its entire lengt

  9. says:

    This was a very strange book I started off loving it and then it curdled on meThe trouble with a travel book is that you

  10. says:

    Rory Stewart walks the border between Scotland and England much of it along Hadrian's Wall This is a fairly long book that contains a lot of historical detail about the region The author's father figures in much of the book and is a very colorful character A survivor of D Day he served with Scottish brigades as well as hav

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *