Kindle ePUB The Anglo Saxon World An Anthology Reading online



10 thoughts on “The Anglo Saxon World An Anthology

  1. says:

    Contains a large proportion of all Anglo Saxon poetry including Beowulf the Dream of the Rood the cross that Christ was crucified on tells us about it's day Deor the Wanderer the Battle of Maldon Saxons trap Viking

  2. says:

    Reading this book has been a lengthy business because I keep returning to read passages and pieces that have become favourites within this lovely book; especially “The Ruin” Hence it’s been a difficult book to ‘finish’ I’m not so much as a one time student of Anglo Saxon let alone an experienced academic in t

  3. says:

    A very good collection of uite a wide range of Anglo Saxon verse including Beowulf and other less known texts They're good translations if I might presume to judge they're readable they have good flow and so far as I can tel

  4. says:

    The works in this anthology included every type of primary source wills charters epic poems like Beowulf sermons letters etc I especially enjoyed the riddles and the poems of the Battle of Maldon and The Wanderer The translations of all the works were excellent It brought a modern understanding to the ancient te

  5. says:

    A wide selection of poetry epic battle literature charms letters laws charters and almost everything else from the Anglo Saxon ageI have only read parts of the entire compilation of works in the anthology The content is hugely varied ranging from Beowulf to letters from the Pope to Saxon Kings and naughty riddles

  6. says:

    This book is an anthology of writings from the Anglo Saxon period of British literature The texts run the range f

  7. says:

    Loved every page of this wonderful collection Apart from heroic poems laws elegies explorer's accounts stories about saints' lives riddles charters and wills charms and remedies allegories and sermons it also contains my new favourite translation of Beowulf

  8. says:

    As far as anthologies go this is just fine It was a great way to find out what I want to read of

  9. says:

    As an introduction to English literature this is the place to start The Anglo Saxon Chronicle itself is an interesting document in that we have the beginnings of what life in England was like once Rome decided keeping that far flung frontier garrisoned was not in their interests And just like today when one military power leaves a power vacuu

  10. says:

    This is the book that got me hooked on the Oxford World Classics series which has not yet failed to provide beautiful translations where even the densest language becomes clearly understandable all the while still keeping the integrity of the original work The Anglo Saxon World gives a sweeping introduction into the literature of the Anglo

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Free download × PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ç Kevin Crossley-Holland

Beowulf The Battle of Maldon The Dream of the Rood The Wanderer and The Seafarer are among the greatest surviving Anglo Saxon poems They and many their treasures are included in The Anglo Saxon World hronicles laws and letters charters and charms and above ll superb poems Here is a word picture of a people who came to these islands as pagans and yet within two hundred years had become Christians to such effect that England was the centre of missionary endeavour and for a time the heart of European civilization IncludesDeorThe Finnesburh fragmentWaldereThe battle of MaldonThe battle of BrunanburhThe laws. Reading this book has been a lengthy business because I keep returning to read passages and pieces that have become favourites within this lovely book especially The Ruin Hence it s been a difficult book to finish I m not so much as a one time student of Anglo Saxon let alone an experienced academic in the subject However I do like the way that Crossley Holland comes over as such a genuine and talented enthusiast His website does nothing to dispel my appreciative thanks to him that his work has increased the scope of my knowledge of that period How very deeply astounded the Anglo Saxons must have been to arrive in England to be confronted by the literally massive evidence of an utterly decayed once great Roman civilisation In Crossley Holland s translation of The Ruin I could visualise not only the patterns of lichens but the very land heave caused by the growth of weeds and larger vegetation Was CS Lewis inspired by The Ruin when he sat down to write Prince Caspian I wonder Crossley Holland s translation of Beowulf left me pondering how uncommon it now is for people to come together to listen to a storyteller maintaining shared knowledge defining a community Anonymity whether real or believed and use of modern computers fragments our society into so very many different communities Perhaps over population plays a part tooMy education in British history began with the Norman Invasion in 1066 Crossley Holland says I hope only that it will prompt those who start on it to continue the journey and look further for themselves Well with me he s certainly succeeding in his aim The Anglo Saxon world this is about than England had been almost as dark as the blackout curtain hanging over the earlier British period of King Arthur and the Dark Ages terms that Crossley Holland has no need to use because they re irrelevant in this book Now my knowledge and appreciation of the roots battle skills and culture of the Anglo Saxon invaders and settlers of our land has been greatly enhanced One feels oddly slightly European for it too Doctors, Ambassadors, Secretaries utterly decayed once great Roman civilisation In Crossley Holland s translation of The Ruin I could visualise not only the patterns of lichens but the very land heave caused by the growth of weeds and larger vegetation Was CS Lewis inspired by The Ruin when he sat down to write Prince Caspian I wonder Crossley Holland s translation of Beowulf left me pondering how Engendering Song uncommon it now is for people to come together to listen to a storyteller maintaining shared knowledge defining a community Anonymity whether real or believed and Listening Woman by Tony Hillerman Summary & Study Guide use of modern computers fragments our society into so very many different communities Perhaps over population plays a part tooMy education in British history began with the Norman Invasion in 1066 Crossley Holland says I hope only that it will prompt those who start on it to continue the journey and look further for themselves Well with me he s certainly succeeding in his aim The Anglo Saxon world this is about than England had been almost as dark as the blackout curtain hanging over the earlier British period of King Arthur and the Dark Ages terms that Crossley Holland has no need to The White Nights of Ramadan use because they re irrelevant in this book Now my knowledge and appreciation of the roots battle skills and culture of the Anglo Saxon invaders and settlers of our land has been greatly enhanced One feels oddly slightly European for it too

review The Anglo Saxon World An Anthology

The Anglo Saxon World An Anthology

Of WihtredTrial by ordealCanute's letter to the people of EnglandThe Anglo Saxon chronicle Vortigern's invitation 449 ; Cynewulf and Cyneheard 757 ; Fiery dragons in Northumbria 793 ; Ashdown and other engagements 878 ; King Alfred and Guthrum 878 ; Stamford Bridge and Hastings 1066The wandererThe seafarerThe wife's lamentThe husband's messageWulfThe ruinOhthere's voyage to the white seaWulfstan's visit to EstoniaBeowulfKing Edwin's councilCaedmon's visionCuthbert's death and disintermentBede on himselfFrom Pope Gregory I to CandidusFrom Boniface to Fulrad Abbot of St DenisFrom Cuthbert Abbot of Wearmo. This book is an anthology of writings from the Anglo Saxon period of British literature The texts run the range from allegories and sermons to heroic epics and legal documents Of course excerpts from The Anglo Saxon Chronicle are included The highlight is a full translation of Beowulf into modern EnglishThe period run from AD 400s when the Romans departed from the British Isles to 1066 when the Normans made their conuest The book is not in chronological order however Different topics are grouped together The book contains plenty of non fiction including slightly boring legal documents which do give interesting insights into how people thought and what they expected in that time Letters and histories also show what people were like Poetry both heroic and Christian though not always both at the same time show the society s ideals of manhood and decent behavior A bigger picture emerges from the variety of writingsSeveral themes emerge from the texts The Anglo Saxons had an ongoing tension between their pagan roots and the Christian influence begun by Augustine of Canterbury who started evangelizing in 597 The pagan notion of Fate a fixed outcome for everyone s lives and for certain events is put alongside divine providence where the Judeo Christian God lets people choose their actions freely but with the aid of grace Beowulf is fated to fight Grendel Grendel s vengeful mother and a dragon though he is empowered by his Christian faith to fight these demonic forces Even with these elements the epic poem is not Christian propaganda just a rollicking good story of an amazing hero The contrasting elements are held side by side and only make the story intriguing Legal documents invoke the Lord s blessing and ancient law and custom as they lay down legal precedents land claims and marriage contracts The Anglo Saxon society was a fascinating blend of cultures and ideasThis book is a a great survey of primary sources from Britain s Anglo Saxon periodHighly recommended

Free download × PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB ç Kevin Crossley-Holland

Uth to LulFrom Alcuin to Ethelred King of NorthumbriaFrom Charlemagne to Offa King of MerciaFrom Radbrod Prior of St Samson's at Dol to King ÆthelstanCaedmon's hymnAdvent lyrics I II and VIIThe dream of the roodDurhamBede's death songLife of King Alfred extractPreface to St Gregory's Pastoral careA collouyThe passion of St EdmundThirty one riddlesA grant of land at CreditonAn estate memorandum duties and peruisitesA marriage agreementA manumissionThe will of King AlfredThree charmsBald's Leechbook extractExcerpt from the PhoenixThe pantherThe whaleThe sermon of the wolf to the EnglishThe fortunes of me. As an introduction to English literature this is the place to start The Anglo Saxon Chronicle itself is an interesting document in that we have the beginnings of what life in England was like once Rome decided keeping that far flung frontier garrisoned was not in their interests And just like today when one military power leaves a power vacuum is formed and everyone starts fighting to be top dog A few things to keep in mind when Cyneheard learns the king is visiting his mistress this is not an affair as we think of it but it s as a concubine Also of importance is the strength of family and blood The only trustworthy relationships are those of your own blood everyone else is suspect Of course the stand out to an anthology like this is always Beowulf I had never read Beowulf before so I wasn t burdened with having been introduced to this work too soon in high school Why this is taught in high school is beyond me it s too complex for most students and the parts that aren t are probably going to offend some litigious parent Luckily my professor Dr Marvin is beyond an expert in this field and was a remarkable guide through the world of Beowulf His most interesting contribution to the analysis of the story comes from the point of view as a hunter Heorot the great hall is attributed to a stag the antlers on the frame and is the heart of the societyAs part of our assignment I was assigned to gloss Beowulf and so I chose the following section to discuss I chose to explore the religious symbolism in the story as it relates to their society and the CovenantBeowulf and the cup of the New Covenant Then the lady of the Helmings walked about the halloffering the precious ornamented cupto old and young alike Beowulf 89In Beowulf gift giving is an important act The King gives rings to the people as payment 76 140 weapons and armor are handed down through families 120 and treasures are rewarded for bravery 100 121 or to solidify a truce 85 However these earthly gifts are transitory and will eventually rust 143 whereas the gift of eternal salvation through Christ s covenant with man is offered repeatedly in the mead halls by the peace weaving women 124Christ s covenant with man is that of an arbitrator someone who will fight evil for us and intercede on our behalf before God No longer does man alone have to bear the burden of upholding ancient laws to achieve God s salvation Christ offers us Grace instead And as part of this deal Christ asks us to have faith in Him alone and to remember this agreement as part of a ritual In the Book of Matthew 2220 ESV Christ tells his disciples This cup that is poured out for you is the new covenant in my blood He asks them and us to drink in memory of Him as a symbol of their faith in Him to succeedThe New Covenant however is exactly what is missing from the world of Beowulf Not only is Christ s Covenant unknown to these people they are even ignorant of the ancient laws preceding it No wonder then that the Danes have angered a terrible creature from the time before even the ancient laws were enacted How can the Danes be merry in Heorot when they live in ignorance of the God who banished these monsters and giants 77 113When Beowulf attempts to rid the world of these terrors he is taking the burden of the Dane s sin upon himself as Christ would for us he is sacrificing himself And we should pause here for a moment to reflect how complicated this image is because we have to remember that Hrothgar puts his faith in Beowulf as we would Christ Hrothgar does not know Christ either yet he behaves correctly in letting a savior take on the burden of sin for him since he is powerless to do so alone Our author is not saying Beowulf is Christ Beowulf eventually loses his earthly treasure his life when he puts faith only in himself 145 Beowulf is a false savior but is not a dishonorable one and thus he was well rewarded in this life for his efforts Yet ignorance of Grace is still no excuse because the cup of Grace is offered to everyone young and old alike 89 in the hall of life Heorot Hrothgar and his wife Wealhtheow understand the meaning of faith and grace and she as a peace weaver 124 offers this knowledge to everyone who might have it she is very Christ like in this regard Even when the cup is stolen 130 and hidden away in a barrow it does not rid the world of our salvation through Grace Jealous evil in the guise of the dragon might guard this treasure from men and so much time may pass that this Grace passes from all memory but it is still there and even a lowly thief or slave 131 can happen upon it and be rewarded with its gift begged his Lord for the bond of peace and that unhappy man was granted his prayer Thus the cup we see referred to over and over in the poem 89 99 103 123 124 129 is truly the cup of the new Covenant filled with the blood of Christ the true hero of mankind according to our poet And another gloss I wrote as part of the larger theme of Forbidden Knowledge For fifty winters Beowulf 129 Beowulf ruled his people well yet what could have caused it all to go so wrong Early in the tale we learn of Hengest s vengeance when the flashing sword Beowulf 102 is placed in his lap Though peace had persisted through winter now that it was spring and his people were no longer reuired to keep the peace he sought his vengeance Hengest s revenge is a clue as to why a dragon has begun to terrorize Beowulf s people This dragon had for three hundred winters Beowulf 131 guarded a treasure which remained buried in a barrow far from man yet because of a slave who was escaping from men s anger Beowulf 130 happened to stumble upon this treasure and carry it off into the world caused the dragon s vengeance was loosed upon Beowulf s kingdomYet what is this treasure and why was it buried The contents are no doubt of great earthly wealth but it s doing little good just buried in the ground What we learn of this treasure is that it had been deliberately buried by someone who was the last of his people perhaps an ancient king like Beowulf and Hrothgar since he is described as the protector of rings Beowulf 130 Yet like Beowulf who also has no heir this protector of rings does not use his wealth to forge any new alliances and thus enrich his fellow man as was custom instead he greedily hides it away from man where it can do no good In effect the treasure becomes symbolic of greed itself and the dragon becomes the consuming conseuences of pursuing this greed the treasure is literally cursed Hidden away this treasure is a forbidden knowledge best left untouched yet Beowulf perhaps wishing to provide for his people financially since he has no heir to provide them with but importantly for the fame it might bestow our epic hero seeks the treasure a knowledge of sorts that is not his in hopes of securing a prosperous futureAnd perhaps if Beowulf had acted like Hrothgar who also had no heir and allowed for a champion to slay this dragon then maybe events would have turned out better However the giver of gold Beowulf disdained to track the dragon with a troop of warlike men Beowulf 133 because his own pride ofermod has convinced him that only he is capable of the feat Beowulf 137 Like the man who buried his treasure in the earth and does not share his wealth Beowulf does not allow for his own people to share in the chance at glory Glory the ultimate goal for the epic hero must be all his just as wealth is the ultimate goal for a man who buries his riches in a barrowBeowulf thus is ultimately consumed by the dragon s fire and dies His obsession with the cursed treasure a uest for what amounts to obtaining a forbidden knowledge coupled with his pride a theme we will see repeated again in Milton is his ultimate undoing